Accessibility Design Guidelines

We are continuously working to increase accessibility standards with Section 508 as well as best practices recommended by the World Wide Web Consortium’s Web Content Accessibility Guidelines (WCAG 2.0) for web accessibility. If you have difficulty accessing the site or have any comments or feedback, please do not hesitate to contact us.

Some of these included are:

  • Text alternative fields for non-text elements.
  • All information conveyed with color can also be understood without color.
  • Legible fonts and high-contrast colors for easy readability.
  • Designed web pages so that all content presented without an associated style sheet does not lose information or structure.
  • Identified row and column headers in data tables.
  • Keyboard accessibility, where all functionality is available through the use of a keyboard and without the use of a mouse.
  • “Skip to main content” link at the top of each page permitting users to skip repetitive navigation links.
  • Online forms are designed allowing assistive technology to access the information, field elements, and functionality required for completion and submission of the form, including all directions and cues.

Understanding the Four Principles of Accessibility

The guidelines and Success Criteria are organized around the following four principles, which lay the foundation necessary for anyone to access and use Web content. Anyone who wants to use the Web must have content that is:

  • Perceivable - Information and user interface components must be presentable to users in ways they can perceive. This means that users must be able to perceive the information being presented (it can't be invisible to all of their senses).
  • Operable - User interface components and navigation must be operable. This means that users must be able to operate the interface (the interface cannot require interaction that a user cannot perform).
  • Understandable - Information and the operation of user interface must be understandable. This means that users must be able to understand the information as well as the operation of the user interface (the content or operation cannot be beyond their understanding.)
  • Robust - Content must be robust enough that it can be interpreted reliably by a wide variety of user agents, including assistive technologies. This means that users must be able to access the content as technologies advance (as technologies and user agents evolve, the content should remain accessible).

Many popular browsers contain built-in accessibility tools.

Internet Explorer Accessibility Information, Firefox Accessibility Information, Chrome Accessibility Information

Adobe Reader is required to view and print PDF documents that appear on this website.

To download this program for free, visit the Adobe website. To read PDF documents with a screen reader, please visit the Adobe Reader Accessibility website which provides useful tools and resources.